Blog http://www.ephf.ca/ en-us Sun, 15 Jan 2017 00:00:00 MSTimages/header.jpghttp://www.ephf.ca/ Spring Show http://www.ephf.ca/Blog.asp?id=22 Sun, 15 Jan 2017 00:00:00 MST

The EPHF Museum will be open for its Spring show on May 26, 2018

Our museum is located on the grounds of the Leduc West Antique Society Grounds, five km west of Leduc off Highway 39. Go North on Range Road 260 (Cohne Dale Road) about a mile , the museu is on your right. Map at bottom of home page

Come out and join us for a day of fun and to check out all our interactive exhibits.

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Emerson Repulsion Start Induction Run AC Motor http://www.ephf.ca/Blog.asp?id=101 Tue, 20 Dec 2016 00:00:00 MST

The Emerson 1901 ½ HP Single Phase AC motor.


The repulsion-start induction-run motor, starts as a repulsion motor and runs as an Induction motor.  The advantage of this starting scheme provided greater starting torque than a split phase motor could provide.  The repulsion start motor rotor is wound similar to a direct current armature.  The stator is energized creating an alternating magnetic field that runs through the rotor and induces a current in the rotor windings.  The commutator brushes are short-circuited, and the currents induced in the armature coils set up poles on the armature surface.  The brushes are set so that the poles are slightly out of line with the stator poles, and the mutual repulsion between like poles on the stator and armature produces the torque.  For more views of the motor and and a description of the starting sequence please watch our video on our video page or on you tube.

View our video on you tube.

 

 

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Thomson Houston 1880’s Dynamo Generator http://www.ephf.ca/Blog.asp?id=100 Tue, 13 Dec 2016 00:00:00 MST

 

View the Video on you Tube

The Edmonton Power Historical Foundation is excited to have this Thomson Houston dynamo running again in time to commemorate the 125th anniversary of electric lights in Edmonton. The first generator to provide electric power in 1891 in Edmonton was a Thomson Houston, albeit an alternating current unit. On December 22, 1891 along the main street of Jasper Avenue in the tiny village of Edmonton, North West Territories, the electric lights came on. 

 

After replacing the bearings, repairing the broken wiring and cleaning the commutator and brush gear we attached an electronic speed control to power the unit as a motor.

 

This rare vintage DC dynamo built sometime in the 1880's had a rated output of 30,000 Watts at 110 volts.

Due to the fragile insulation, we are unwilling to spin it at the recommended generation speed of 1150 rpm. Instead, we are applying 12V DC at about 35 amps to display it running, but at a safer speed of 50 rpm.

 

The spherical (or ball) armature is a unique feature of Thomson Houston DC dynamos of this period. Other distinctive features are the iron bars to connect the field poles and the unusual brass wire mesh brushes.

 

It is rather impressive that after 125 years the unit still runs.

 

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Generator Synchronization Interactive Display http://www.ephf.ca/Blog.asp?id=95 Tue, 15 Mar 2016 00:00:00 MST

A Generator Synchronizing procedure is used to safely connect an A.C. generator to another running generator or to the grid.

 Before closing the breaker several conditions have to be met on the incoming machine:

  • The frequency must match the running system

  • The Voltage must match the running system

  • The phase angle of the incoming generator must match the phase angle of running system precisely at the moment the breaker is closed to tie the systems together.

This panel has double running and incoming frequency and volt meters, a rotary analog synchroscope (also lamps) to match phase angle, an oscilloscope to visualize the process, and controls to change the incoming voltage and frequency.

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Mercury Arc Rectifier http://www.ephf.ca/Blog.asp?id=27 Sat, 5 Mar 2016 00:00:00 MST

View a Video of an Operating Rectifier

Mercury Arc Rectifiers were used to convert Alternating Current (AC) power to Direct Current (DC) power. They were used by Edmonton Power starting in the 1920s until they were phased out in the 1990s.

Mercury Arc Rectifiers were used mainly to provide DC power for Edmonton's street cars and trolley buses.

Note: the photo the bulbs on the right were taken at Fort Edmonton Park 2012-09-13 at 5:36 PM

they last ran in Oct of 2012

 

Reated item: meter

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Belliss and Morcom Steam Engine http://www.ephf.ca/Blog.asp?id=26 Wed, 24 Feb 2016 00:00:00 MST

The Belliss and Morcom Steam Engine represents several steam engines used in the 1903 generating station.

A steam engine is an external combustion heat engine that makes use of the heat energy that exists in steam and converting it to mechanical energy.

Steam engines were used as the prime movers in pumping stations, locomotives, steam ships, traction engines, steam lorries and other road vehicles. They were essential to the Industrial Revolution and saw widespread commercial use driving machinery in factories and mills.

Most steam engines have been superseded by internal combustion engines and electrical motors. However, steam turbines, which are technically a type of steam engine, are still widely used for generating electricity.

 

 

Nameplate from side of Engine End view of Generator

See Animation of steam plant

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